Sale!
Placeholder

A study of semi-formal and formal methods

10,000 3,000

Topic Description

 ALL listed project topics on our website are complete material from chapter 1-5 which are well supervised and approved by lecturers who are intellectual in their various fields of discipline, documented to assist you with complete, quality and well organized researched materials. which should be use as reference or Guild line...  See frequently asked questions and answeres



Summary
The purpose of this project is to research the use of semi-formal and formal approaches in the analysis
and specification of software systems. Analysis and specification are two important stages in the
lifecycle of a software system, since this is the place where any ambiguity can be resolved and
corrected with less effort and cost. The result from a well-defined specification is that it is clear how
the system under-development will behave.
It is commonly known that formal methods can provide mathematical precision and therefore,
assurance that the specifications produced are correct. However, they are not often applied in real
world projects for several reasons that have been mentioned in this report.
On the other side, semi-formal approaches, in particular UML, are gaining wider and wider
acceptance over the last years.
It will be interesting to examine the two methodologies and compare them.
For this purpose, an analysis of three case studies using UML and Z – two of the most popular semiformal
and formal approaches respectively – has been carried out and the two formalisms have been
compared based on the results obtained from the case studies. The case studies that have been
presented are: the Library Management System, the Video Store System and an automated Insulin
Pump System. The evaluation of the results has been accomplished by meeting real/prospective
users/customers. The feedback received from the potential users/customers of the three systems that
have been analysed was also presented.
The aim of this study was to try and estimate how possible it is to produce reliable and error-free
software based on concrete specifications. A way of integrating the two methodologies based on the
characteristics that each can offer in order to produce a new ‘lighter’ formal method was also
proposed. This ‘lighter’ approach was the subject of research of [Xiaoping], whose proposal has been
reviewed.

Table of Contents
Table of contents………………………………………………………………………………………. i
Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………iv
Acknowledgements…………………………………………………………………………………… v
Table of figures………………………………………………………………………………………. vi
Z glossary……………………………………………………………………………………………. vii
Chapter 1: Introduction
1.1. Introduction……………………………………………………………………………….1
1.2. Problem Definition………………………………………………………………………..1
1.3. The need for Formalism…………………………………………………………………..2
1.4. Project Objectives…………………………………………………….…………………..3
1.5. Achieving the Objectives…………………………………………………………………3
1.6. Minimum Project Requirements………………………………………………………….3
1.7. Project Deliverables…………………………………………………………………..…..4
1.8. Project Schedule……………………………………………………………………..……4
1.9. Project Revision………………………………………………………………………..….4
Chapter 2: Informal/Semi-formal methods
2.1 From Informal to Semi-formal methods……………………………………………………5
2.2 Advantages of Semi-formal methods………………………………………………………5
2.3 Disadvantages of Semi-formal methods……………………………………………………5
2.4 Examples of Semi-formal methods…………………………………………………………6
2.4.1 Entity Relationship Diagrams (ERD)………………………………………………………6
2.4.2 Data Flow Diagrams (DFD)………………………………………………………………..8
2.4.3 State Transition Diagrams (STD)…………………………………………………………..9
2.4.5 Petri Nets (PN)……………………………………………………………………………11
ii
Semi-formal and Formal methods Maria Emmanouilidou
2.4.6 UML… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 13
2.4.7 The decision to use UML… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 17
2.5 Summary… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..18
Chapter 3: Formal methods
3.1 Defining Formal methods… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .19
3.2. Why programming languages also not appropriate… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..19
3.3 Advantages of Formal methods… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 20
3.4 Disadvantages of Formal methods… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 21
3.4.1 Myths about Formal methods… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . 22
3.5 Formal Specification Languages/Approaches… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..22
3.5.1 Model Oriented… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .23
3.5.2 Algebraic… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..… 23
3.5.3 Process Model… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 23
3.5.4 Logical… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . 24
3.5.5 Constructive… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..24
3.5.6 Broad Spectrum… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 24
3.6 Examples of Formal Specification Languages/Approaches… … … … … … … … … … … … 25
3.6.1 VDM… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .25
3.6.2 Z… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 26
3.6.3 OBJ… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 27
3.6.4 CSP… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 28
3.6.5 NUPRL… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 28
3.6.6 RAISE… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 29
3.6.7 LOTOS… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .29
3.7 The decision to use Z… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 30
3.7 Summary… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .31
Chapter 4: Case Studies analysis and specification
iii
Semi-formal and Formal methods Maria Emmanouilidou
4.1 Case Studies Scenarios… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .… … … … … … … … . 32
4.1.1 The Library Management System… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 32
4.1.2 The Video Store System… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . 33
4.1.3 An automated Insulin Pump System… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 34
4.2 The UML approach… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 35
4.3 The Z approach… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 38
4.4 Conclusions based on the case studies… … … … .… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . 42
4.5 Strengths and weaknesses of the formalisms… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . 42
4.6 A proposal to integrate UML and Z… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 43
4.7 Summary… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .44
Chapter 5: Conclusion and evaluation
5.1 Case studies evaluation… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 45
5.1.1 Objectives evaluation… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..45
5.1.2 Customer’s evaluation… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .46
5.1.3 Known issues… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .… … … … … … … ..47
5.2 Future enhancements… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 48
Chapter 6: Bibliography and references… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 49
Appendix A: Reflection… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .53
Appendix B: Case study I “The Library Management System”… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 54
Appendix C: Case study II “The Video Store System”… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .70
Appendix D: Case study III “An automatic Insulin Pump System”… … … … …

GET COMPLETE MATERIAL